Women back on the grid in F1

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May 26, 2018
FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, May 27, 2017, so called "grid girls" line up after the qualifying session for the Formula One Grand Prix at the Monaco racetrack in Monaco. (AP)

MONACO (AP):

Women will make a return of sorts to the Formula One (F1) grid at this weekend's Monaco Grand Prix, although not in the previous "grid girls" role now discarded.

Instead of women standing in front of each car, holding up the driver's race number, men and women representing watchmaker Tag Heuer will take photos of the drivers for social media purposes. There will be a man and a woman for each driver and they will also report fans' comments back to drivers.

Early this year, F1 ended the long-standing practice of using "grid girls."

The tradition saw women dressed in uniform walking onto the grid shortly before the race start, holding up placards. Women would also stand alongside the top three drivers on the podium after the race. F1 managing director for commercial operations Sean Bratches said in January the practice was no longer appropriate, a move met with more approval outside of F1 itself.

Michel Boeri, the president of Monaco's Automobile Club, disagreed with the decision.

"Our American friends considered that employing young women to hold up placards contributes to demeaning (women)," Boeri said in local newspaper Nice-Matin. "Our hostesses come from modelling and communication colleges. They are elegant and in the image of Monaco."

welcomed the decision

But French driver Romain Grosjean welcomed the decision to scrap it.

"When it was removed, I thought it was a good thing for women in the 21st Century because they were not used as just a board holder," Grosjean said.

However, he remains a rare disapproving voice.

Four-time F1 champion Lewis Hamilton welcomes the return, although he expressed reservations.

"I think women are the most beautiful thing in the world. When we pull up to the grid and there are beautiful women on the grid, that's the Monaco Grand Prix, that's a lovely thing," the British driver said this week. "But I definitely don't think that we should ever be supporting or pushing these women in general to feel uncomfortable. And if they are, then we shouldn't do it."

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